Learn more about Juneteenth

Join the conversation

On Thursday, June 17 at 1 p.m. EST, tune in for a live Q&A on the official @georgemasonu Instagram for a discussion of the significance of Juneteenth and ways to celebrate it.

Listen in

Check out this episode of Mason’s Access to Excellence podcast, Doing the work: Anti-racism, inclusion and disrupting inequality, where President Gregory Washington speaks with Wendi Manuel-Scott and Shernita Parker, co-directors of Mason’s Anti-Racism and Inclusive Excellence Task Force about the university’s commitment to be a national leader in this dialogue.

Check out some library resources

Explore new resources, such as the Gale Slavery & Anti-Slavery collections or the Readex African American collections. Read more about them below, or peruse other databases and subject guides to find additional resources.

Slavery and Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive is devoted to the study and understanding of the history of slavery in America and the rest of the world from the 17th century to the late 19th century. Archival collections were sourced from more than 60 libraries at institutions such as the Amistad Research Center, Bibliothèque nationale de France, the National Archives, Oberlin College, Oxford University, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and Yale University. In its entirety, Slavery and Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive consists of more than five million cross-searchable pages sourced from books, pamphlets, newspapers, periodicals, legal documents, court records, monographs, manuscripts, and maps from many different countries covering the history of the slave trade.

African Americans and Reconstruction, 1865-1883 contains nearly 1,400 fully searchable printed works from the end of the Civil War to the beginning of Jim Crow.  It includes documents related to African Americans and citizenship, voting rights, literacy, land rights, employment, and more, including the gaps between written law and practice.

African Americans and Jim Crow, 1883-1922 contains more than 1,000 fully searchable printed works from the beginning of Jim Crow to post-World War I. These works provide insights into African American culture and life during this period of segregation and disenfranchisement and include such topics as African American identity, relationships with peoples of other nations, and literature.

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