Fenwick Gallery: Allure of the Locale

Fenwick Gallery is pleased to host Extended Image: The Allure of the Locale, an exhibition of Mason student artists from the ‘Extended Image’ AVT Study Abroad program in Tuscany, Italy. The exhibition will run from August 1 – September 27, 2019, with an artists’ talk on Wednesday, September 11, at 2pm in Fenwick Library. 

Allure: a noun expressing a quality of a place and experience that has the presence to powerfully and mysteriously be attractive or fascinating. 

Locale: a place, environment, or setting where something special has happened; as a scene or setting in a story, play, or film. 

Works in The Allure of Locale were created by student artists participating in ‘Extended Image,’ a course in Mason’s Art & Visual Technology Study Abroad program in Tuscany, Italy. Their mission was to incorporate an experimental mixed-media approach to their art process, embracing the concept of response to the environment through their personal experience. Their inspiration is a land renowned for its richness of art in both traditional and contemporary history, from the landscape of Tuscany, to the ancient wonders of Rome, to the 21st-century contemporary art museum, the MAXXI. 

The resulting artworks are distinct, produced through varied practices including painting, photography, collage, printmaking, as well as video and 3D story-making. This exhibit represents the visions of five artists: Lauren Patrizi Carpenter, Kime Howard, Michaela Japec, Rachel Quinn, and Setareh Sabti, their art forming individualized yet cohesive bodies of work.

Details about the artist talk and further information about Fenwick Gallery are available on the gallery website, http://fenwickgallery.gmu.edu/.

Fenwick Gallery: Diaspora Diction

Fenwick Gallery at George Mason University presents Diaspora Diction, an exhibition of photography from artist Adriana Monsalve. The exhibition will run from May 28 through July 26, 2019, with an opening artist’s talk and reception on May 28 at 2:00pm in Fenwick Library. This exhibition is presented as part of the Mason Libraries Artist-in-Residence pilot program.

The first artist to participate in this pilot residency, Adriana Monsalve is a Maryland-based artist and collaborative publisher working in the photobook medium. Along with Caterina Ragg, Monsalve is co-founder of Homie House Press, a radical cooperative platform that challenges the ever-changing forms of storytelling with image and text.

Diaspora Diction collects Monsalve’s photographs, photobooks, and ongoing research into identity—and illusions of identity—in the African and Latinx diaspora. The exhibition features images from Monsalve’s first photobook, Clear as Black, a deeply personal and investigative documentary of the community and stories of individuals with a rare type of albinism found in Puerto Rico. Home to a vast hybridity of people, Puerto Rico is also the capital of the world for albinism. “There are layers upon layers that make up how albinism manifests physically, inside and out,” said Monsalve. “Albinism is not just white on this island, it’s black too. There are people who have the condition of albinism, but do not display the physical characteristics commonly known of a person with albinism. They are black, white and everything in between, and they are all people with albinism.”

Diaspora Diction also includes a second, separate body of work in progress, tentatively titled Novena. Photographed during a subsequent visit to Puerto Rico, Novena follows the family of Ricardito, one of subjects of Clear as Black, in the days immediately following the death of his grandfather, the family patriarch.

During the residency at Mason, Monsalve continued her research into these questions of identity, expanding her scope to the Melungeon communities in Appalachia. “This is investigative research in the greater world of the African diaspora. There are communities world-wide, past and present whose blackness was hidden to assimilate, prosper, and ultimately to survive. There are more that simply have no idea they are connected to something other than what mainstream world refers to as ‘white-passing.’ Folks that happen to be white aren’t taught to question that whiteness when speaking about identity, so the fact that these things fall under the scope of investigation is a wild assumption. They are never questioned, and don’t inquire about the self. The continuing research of Clear As Black, moving forward, is about this buried blackness in the North American region of Appalachia.”

The Mason Libraries Artist-in-Residence program, currently in its pilot year, invites an artist to expand or develop a project through research in the libraries’ collections and dialogue with Mason students, faculty, and library staff. More information on the Mason Libraries Artist-in-Residence program is available on the Fenwick Gallery website, http://fenwickgallery.gmu.edu/residency.

Diaspora Diction will be on display in Fenwick Gallery, located in Fenwick Library on Mason’s Fairfax campus, from May 28 to July 26, 2019. The gallery is open during Library business hours; see the Library’s website at http://library.gmu.edu for the most accurate and up-to-date information.

For more information on this exhibition at Fenwick Gallery, contact Stephanie Grimm, Art and Art History Librarian, at sgrimm4@gmu.edu. For general inquiries about the University Libraries or George Mason University, contact Jessica Clark, Development and Communications Officer, at jclarkw@gmu.edu.

Artist-in-Residence: Artist’s Talk

Fenwick Gallery will present Diaspora Diction, an exhibition of photography from Adriana Monsalve, Mason Libraries’ first Artist-in-Residence. The exhibition will be on display from May 28 through July 26, 2019. Please join us for an opening artist’s talk and reception on Tuesday, May 28 at 2 p.m. in Fenwick 2001. As part of her artist’s talk, Monsalve will discuss the works included in Diaspora Diction as well as the research conducted during her residency at Mason, where she has continued her exploration of questions of identity.

Opening in Fenwick Gallery: J Carrier’s Elementary Calculus

Elementary Calculus, through a series of portraits, landscapes and still life photographs, observes the publicly private moments of migrants and refugees in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem as they attempt to connect back to their homes. In photographing these peregrine foreigners, the project explores the distance between reality and desire – the want for what was and the hope for what will be – and traces the manner in which we navigate this desolate geography. The photographs resonate with the sense that in a foreign landscape distance loses its physical measure and home feels like a hazy memory, a half-remembered dream.

Elementary Calculus was published by MACK in September, 2012, and selected for numerous year end “best of” lists and was also included in the 2013 International Center of Photography Triennial. Work from J Carrier’s recent projects, Mi´raj  and In Circles, will also be published by MACK in the coming year.

Elementary Calculus will be on display April 24 – May 24, 2019, in Fenwick Gallery. Please join us on Tuesday, April 30, from 11am to 12pm in Fenwick 2001 for an artist talk with J Carrier.

About the artist: J Carrier (b. Biloxi, Mississippi) spent a decade living and working in Africa and the Middle East, and after a five year stint in Brooklyn, returned home to Washington D.C where he lives with his wife and kids.  Carrier is an assistant professor at George Mason University. He formerly taught at Cornell University, the International Center of Photography (NYC), and Western Connecticut State. He has a BS in wildlife & fisheries science and forestry from the Pennsylvania State University (1996) and an MFA from the Hartford Art School (2012).  Carrier’s commissioned work has appeared in the New York Times magazine, National Geographic, Time, Fortune, CNN, Newsweek, Men’s Journal, XXL, Dazed and Confused, Le Monde, and The Financial Times and has won many awards. He was nominated for PDN30 (2016), the John Gutmann Photography Fellowship (2013 & 2012), and the Santa Fe Prize for Photography (2011).

About Fenwick Gallery: Fenwick Gallery is located in Fenwick Library on Mason’s Fairfax campus. The gallery is open during Library business hours; see the Library’s website at http://library.gmu.edu for the most accurate and up-to-date information. For additional information about the Gallery, visit http://fenwickgallery.gmu.edu/. For questions about this exhibition or Fenwick Gallery, contact Stephanie Grimm, Art and Art History Librarian, at sgrimm4@gmu.edu.