Faculty: Apply by September 30 for a course redesign grant

We are excited to announce that the Request for Proposals for the second round of VIVA Course Redesign Grants is now open. These grants are designed to empower faculty at Virginia higher education institutions with the resources and time they need to redesign courses by swapping out expensive textbooks for open, no cost, or library options. These materials may be adopted as is, adapted, or created from scratch.

This program awards grants from $1,000-$30,000 to assist faculty members at any VIVA institution in transitioning to course materials available at no cost to students, such as open educational textbooks and/or library resources. Full or part-time faculty may apply. Proposals may involve one person or teams that include: teaching faculty, librarians, instructional designers, subject matter experts, editors, graphic designers, or others as needed. Applications that include multi-institutional partnerships are encouraged.

More information, including the full Request for Proposals, application details, and the evaluation rubric are available at http://vivalib.org/courseredesign.

Applications are due September 30, 2019, and award notification will take place on December 9, 2019.

Informational webinars will be held at the following times, and will include a general introduction to the grants, the application process, and a Q&A:

Successful applications will be selected on the basis of:

  • Potential for student savings, including class enrollment and existing resource costs
  • Use of Open Educational Resources (freely available and free to be modified)
  • Frequency of course offering, with a preference for high-enrollment, required courses, and/or courses that are part of the SCHEV Passport Program
  • Impact of the project on open education, such as the development of high quality resources in areas for which no other open content is currently available
  • Preference for statewide reach through multi-institutional efforts
  • Commitment to continue offering the course for future years
  • Agreement to the terms of the grant and required activities

Questions about the program may be submitted to viva@gmu.edu.

George Mason University faculty interested in VIVA’s program or, more generally, in utilizing Open Educational Resources and no-cost or low-cost learning resources can find additional information about support provided by the University Libraries at the following site: https://library.gmu.edu/oer    

*VIVA is funded by the Virginia General Assembly and VIVA member institutions, and is sponsored by the State Council of Higher Education (SCHEV). 

Have you completed your mandatory Records Coordinator training?

University Records Management is hosting workshops for newly assigned Records Coordinators to completely their mandatory training, as outlined in University Policy 1102. University Records Management governs this compliance area for Mason; improper handling of University records can affect audits, accreditation, litigation, and more. The Records Coordinator role is responsible for communication between their department and University Records Management.

This workshop will cover records management basics, a review of local and federal laws that govern information management within the University, services available to University departments and offices, electronic records and data management, and creating internal records policies for individual departments. Records Coordinators will receive materials from this workshop to share with their departments.

Workshops will take place in the Special Collections Research Center Seminar Room (Fenwick Library, Room 2400), from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.:

  • Tuesday, May 21, 2019
  • Thursday, May 23, 2019
  • Thursday, June 6, 2019
  • Wednesday, June 12, 2019
  • Tuesday, June 18, 2019
  • Thursday, June 20, 2019

Opening in Fenwick Gallery: J Carrier’s Elementary Calculus

Elementary Calculus, through a series of portraits, landscapes and still life photographs, observes the publicly private moments of migrants and refugees in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem as they attempt to connect back to their homes. In photographing these peregrine foreigners, the project explores the distance between reality and desire – the want for what was and the hope for what will be – and traces the manner in which we navigate this desolate geography. The photographs resonate with the sense that in a foreign landscape distance loses its physical measure and home feels like a hazy memory, a half-remembered dream.

Elementary Calculus was published by MACK in September, 2012, and selected for numerous year end “best of” lists and was also included in the 2013 International Center of Photography Triennial. Work from J Carrier’s recent projects, Mi´raj  and In Circles, will also be published by MACK in the coming year.

Elementary Calculus will be on display April 24 – May 24, 2019, in Fenwick Gallery. Please join us on Tuesday, April 30, from 11am to 12pm in Fenwick 2001 for an artist talk with J Carrier.

About the artist: J Carrier (b. Biloxi, Mississippi) spent a decade living and working in Africa and the Middle East, and after a five year stint in Brooklyn, returned home to Washington D.C where he lives with his wife and kids.  Carrier is an assistant professor at George Mason University. He formerly taught at Cornell University, the International Center of Photography (NYC), and Western Connecticut State. He has a BS in wildlife & fisheries science and forestry from the Pennsylvania State University (1996) and an MFA from the Hartford Art School (2012).  Carrier’s commissioned work has appeared in the New York Times magazine, National Geographic, Time, Fortune, CNN, Newsweek, Men’s Journal, XXL, Dazed and Confused, Le Monde, and The Financial Times and has won many awards. He was nominated for PDN30 (2016), the John Gutmann Photography Fellowship (2013 & 2012), and the Santa Fe Prize for Photography (2011).

About Fenwick Gallery: Fenwick Gallery is located in Fenwick Library on Mason’s Fairfax campus. The gallery is open during Library business hours; see the Library’s website at http://library.gmu.edu for the most accurate and up-to-date information. For additional information about the Gallery, visit http://fenwickgallery.gmu.edu/. For questions about this exhibition or Fenwick Gallery, contact Stephanie Grimm, Art and Art History Librarian, at sgrimm4@gmu.edu.

GMU Press Book Launch: George Washington and Native Americans

Join us for a panel discussion in celebration of the recent publication of George Washington and Native Americans, the latest from the George Mason University Press, on Thursday, April 4, at 3 p.m. in Fenwick 2001.

Richard Harless (author, George Washington and Native Americans), George Oberle (History Librarian, University Libraries and Affiliate Faculty, History and Art History, George Mason University), and Randolph Scully (Associate Professor, History and Art History, George Mason University) will discuss the complexities of this topic in American history and will include time for Q&A with the audience. Books will be available for purchase, and refreshments will be provided (courtesy of the University Bookstore).

About the book: George Washington had contact with Native Americans throughout most of his life. His first encounter as a teenager left him with the impression that they were nothing more than an “ignorant people.” As a young man he fought both alongside and against Native Americans during the French and Indian War and gained a grudging respect for their fighting abilities. During the American Revolution, Washington made it clear that he welcomed Indian allies as friends but would do his utmost to crush Indian enemies. As president, he sought to implement a program to “civilize” Native Americans by teaching them methods of agriculture and providing the implements of husbandry that would enable them to become proficient farmers—the only way, he believed, Native Americans would survive in a white-dominated society. Yet he discovered that his government could not protect Indian lands as guaranteed in countless treaties, and the hunger for Indian land by white settlers was so rapacious that it could not be controlled by an inadequate federal military establishment. While Washington appeared to admit the failure of the program, this book—a unique and necessary exploration of Washington’s experience with and thoughts on Native Americans—contends he deserves credit for his continued efforts to implement a policy based on the just treatment of America’s indigenous peoples.

About the author: Richard Harless has a Ph.D. in American History from George Mason University. He is a retired public school teacher, counselor, and coach. He worked as a research assistant at Mason’s Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media and was a fellow at the Fred W. Smith Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon. He is currently teaching at various colleges including Saint Mary’s Honor College in Maryland. George Washington and Native Americans is his first book.

About GMU Press: The George Mason University Press supports the academic mission of George Mason University by publishing peer-reviewed, scholarly works of distinction, written by authors from a wide range of intellectual perspectives, for a diverse, worldwide readership. GMU Press publishes in a variety of disciplines with special focus on the history, politics, and culture of Northern Virginia and the wider District of Columbia metropolitan area, as well as other topics such as public policy, international affairs, and higher education.