Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2018

Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2018 will take place from Monday, February 26 through Friday, March 2. Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week is an annual celebration, commissioned by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), designed the highlight, explain, and promote the doctrines of fair use and fair dealing. Check out their new infographic on how fair use promotes the creation of new knowledge!

More questions on fair use? Check out these resource pages compiled by our own Mason Publishing Group on Fair Use and on Open Access, OERs, Fair Use and Copyright.

Welcome Back from the Mason Libraries

It’s a new semester! Don’t forget the Mason Libraries are here to help you succeed!

Mason Libraries offers free 24/7 online access to electronic resources for Mason faculty, students and staff – just use your Mason NetID and password. Check out our step-by-step guide to e-resource databases, e-books, e-journals, media, and more. To explore our 775+ database subscriptions, start with the A-Z database list.

More information about the libraries’ collections are available online (including our special collections), as well as subject guides (a great starting point for research) and contact information for our subject librarians (subject experts who can provide personalized research assistance).

Need a quick refresher on where everything is in Fenwick Library? Check out our online tour guide. Not sure where a certain book might be located? Enter the call number and find it on this map of the Fenwick stacks. Looking for open educational resources? Check out our new OER Metafinder. Can’t find something you need at Mason? Use interlibrary loan to borrow materials from other academic institutions.

We’re here to help – come visit! Our hours are posted and updated regularly, including virtual reference hours if you have questions but are unable to stop by. We also host numerous instructional workshops and cultural events throughout the semester. Check our website and news blog for announcements.

We look forward to working with you and helping you succeed in your academic and professional careers!

Online Resources: Relax + Refresh!

Need to relax as you finish your papers and projects? Thinking about the winter break? Check out what Mason Libraries has for you:

  • Watch Oscar winning independent films, such as Twilight Samurai or The Scent of Green Papaya, in our New World Cinema database, which includes 200 full-length feature films and award-winning short films.
  • Stream a variety of documentaries and social issue films on Docuseek
  • Kick back with one of the 700 recent fiction and non-fiction books housed in Mason Libraries’ Recommended Reads collection in Gateway Library
  • Listen to the blues music of Muddy Waters or folk songs by Bob Dylan in Music Online: American Music.
  • Choose a classic Mozart symphony, holiday music from a dozen countries around the world, or one of the 44,000 tracks of blues, jazz, gospel, ragtime, spiritual, spoken word, and more – available in Music Online: Smithsonian Global Sound for Libraries. 

Mason Libraries’ online resources are available 24/7 – free – for all Mason faculty, students, and staff. For more information or more choices, browse our A-Z list or subject collections of online resources. Enjoy your break – short or long!

Mason Author Titles

We are highlighting some recent publications by Mason authors, representing various academic disciplines and viewpoints. All are available for checkout from the Libraries! Remember, you can find more faculty and alumni publications and profiles over at the Mason Spirit. You can find more titles in the Libraries’ collection by checking out our Faculty Author Collection at bit.ly/masonauthors.


The Chance of Salvation: A History of Conversion in America
Lincoln A. Mullen, Assistant Professor, History and Art History

The Chance of Salvation (Harvard University Press, August 2017) offers a history of conversions in the United States which shows how religious identity came to be a matter of choice. By uncovering the way religious identity is structured as obligatory decision, this book explores why Americans change religions and why the U.S. is both highly religious in terms of religious affiliation and very secular in the sense that no religion is an unquestioned default.


Trump Effect 
Karina V. Korostelina, Professor, School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution

In Trump Effect (Routledge, October 2016), Korostelina explains how the support for Trump among the American general public is based on three pillars: 1) Trump champions a specific conception of American national identity that empowers his supporters, 2) Trump’s leadership has been crafted from his ability to recognize where and with whom he can get the most return on his investment, and 3) Trump challenges the existing political balance of power within the United States and globally.


Governing Under Stress: The Implementation of Obama’s Economic Stimulus Program
Timothy J. Conlan, Priscilla M. Regan, and Paul L. Posner, Schar School of Policy and Government

Governing Under Stress (Georgetown University Press, January 2017) presents perspectives on the implementation and performance of President Obama’s economic stimulus program, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). It explores the management of ARRA within all levels of government as well as its portrayals in the media and public perception. Contributors draw upon more than 200 interviews and nationwide field research to present insights into the challenges facing public policy and management.


Resolving Structural Conflicts: How Violent Systems Can Be Transformed
Richard E. Rubenstein, University Professor, School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution

Resolving Structural Conflicts (Routledge, January 2017) analyzes how certain social systems generate violent conflict and discusses how such systems can be transformed to create the conditions for positive peace. The book addresses a key issue in the field of conflict studies: what to do about violent conflicts that are not the results of misunderstanding, prejudice, or malice, but the products of a social system that generates violent conflict as part of its normal operations.


The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream
Tyler Cowen, BS Economics ’83, Holbert L. Harris Chair of Economics; Distinguished Senior Fellow, F.A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics; and General Director, Mercatus Center

In The Complacent Class (St. Martin’s Press, February 2017), Cowen examines the trend of Americans away from the traditionally mobile, risk-accepting, and adaptable tendencies that defined them for much of recent history, and toward stagnation and comfort. He argues that this development has the potential to make future changes more disruptive.