Center for Mason Legacies releases “Black Lives Next Door” preliminary findings

The Center for Mason Legacies (CML) invites you to explore their newly created digital project, Black Lives Next Door: George Mason and Northern Virginia in an Age of Disparity and Opportunity (BLND). Building on work that began in 2020, BLND is presenting its first set of findings and inviting our community to take a journey through our “pasts next door” and related stories. Read the full announcement here.

About the Center for Mason Legacies: CML is an interdisciplinary and collaborative research center established by the University Libraries and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. CML’s mission is to preserve and examine the legacy of George Mason IV (1725-1792), his ancestors and heirs, and the people he enslaved. Learn more about the center here and their various research projects here.

New exhibit – Sanctuary: The Zines Edition

Sanctuary: The Zines Edition features the work of students in the Mason School of Art “Zines and Self-Publishing” class, led by Emily Fussner. This exhibition is held in parallel with a larger exhibit, Sanctuary, organized by artists and arts management students at Mason.

Students considered a single question, “What does sanctuary mean to you?,” and responded with these intimate works that invite readers into personal, sometimes vulnerable spaces while also offering comfort and connection. The zines are exhibited in a hybrid virtual/physical space, with copies on display in Fenwick Gallery and online. Printable versions of each zine are included on the artists’ individual pages, allowing viewers to keep their own, personal copy of each work.

Sanctuary: The Zines Edition is curated by Fenwick Gallery GRA Andi Benge, with exhibition support from the Art and Art History Librarian, Stephanie Grimm.

Please note: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, access to the Fenwick Gallery in the Fenwick Library is currently limited to Mason students, staff, and faculty. Please enjoy our virtual exhibit if you are unable to visit campus.

The Libraries at Mason – Spring Issue

Our annual issue of The Libraries at Mason magazine is now available. Special features include our Oral History Program and partnership with the Mason Osher Lifelong Learning Institute; faculty research endeavours; and our inaugural Artist-in-Residence program. We hope you enjoy this issue!

Mason Libraries Celebrates Engineers Week

In honor of National Engineers Week (February 16-22), Mason Engineering is hosting a number of events for students, alumni, and the local community, with the theme of “Patriots for Progress.” In conjunction, Mason Libraries is hosting an exhibition – Crunching Numbers + Gathering Data, highlighting items from the Sidney O. Dewberry Collection of Surveying & Engineering Technology.

Sidney Dewberry, co-founder of Dewberry (a nationwide firm of planning, design, and construction professionals) and generous philanthropist to George Mason University and other causes, is also a collector of antique surveying and engineering tools.

A number of these antique tools will be on display on the second floor of Fenwick Library, from February 6 through February 24, in honor of National Engineers Week. Included in the exhibit are a set of graduated railroad drafting curves, a Curta hand-crank mechanical calculator, a Buff & Berger water current meter, and other unique tools.

Items from Mr. Dewberry’s collection have been exhibited in the Library of Congress, the Library of Virginia, Mt. Vernon, and at National Society of Professional Surveyor’s conferences.

National Engineers Week, started in 1951 by the National Society of Professional Engineers, is dedicated to ensuring a diverse and well-educated future engineering workforce by increasing understanding of and interest in engineering and technology careers.

Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War

On display in Fenwick Library Atrium, February 3 – March 10, the National Library of Medicine’s traveling exhibition Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War explores the heroism and brutality of battlefield operations and the challenges of caring for the wounded during wartime. Of the three million soldiers who fought in the war from 1861-1865, hundreds of thousands were permanently disabled by battlefield injuries or surgery. This exhibition focuses on disabled veterans and their role as symbols of the fractured nation.

Join us on Tuesday March 3 at 1:30 in 2001 Fenwick Library for a special presentation on Civil War medicine. Alyssa Fahringer, Digital Scholarship Consultant in the Digital Scholarship Center, will discuss relevant primary sources from the era, highlighting resources in Mason Libraries’ online collections. Jake Wynn, the Director of Interpretation at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, will describe how the innovations of Civil War medicine paved the way for our modern emergency medical system.

Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.