New exhibition in Music Library

Musical Rarities II: A Sampling from Mason Libraries Special Collections is now on display in the Music Library (Fenwick Library, Second Floor). Curated by Steve Gerber, Music & Theater Librarian, this exhibit features facsimiles of rare, music-related items from the Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center.

What is a musical rarity? It’s a music-related item (e.g. manuscript, printed book or score, image, or object) that is scarce – it might be curious, remarkable, valuable, or worth collecting for some reason (such as its usefulness in exemplifying an aspect of music history). Our musical rarities on display include:

  • a first edition of the world’s #1 jazz standard, “Body and Soul” (London, 1930)
  • a “Trauermarsch” (Grief March), memorializing Jewish victims of a 1905 massacre
  • an illustrated “how-to” book on dancing the tarantella, lithographed in Naples ca. 1845
  • a manuscript of a Latin offertory for three solo voices with organ, composed by Francesco Basili (Italian, early 19th century)

For further information, contact Steve Gerber, Music & Theater Librarian, at sgerber@gmu.edu.

Fenwick Gallery: Diaspora Diction

Fenwick Gallery at George Mason University presents Diaspora Diction, an exhibition of photography from artist Adriana Monsalve. The exhibition will run from May 28 through July 26, 2019, with an opening artist’s talk and reception on May 28 at 2:00pm in Fenwick Library. This exhibition is presented as part of the Mason Libraries Artist-in-Residence pilot program.

The first artist to participate in this pilot residency, Adriana Monsalve is a Maryland-based artist and collaborative publisher working in the photobook medium. Along with Caterina Ragg, Monsalve is co-founder of Homie House Press, a radical cooperative platform that challenges the ever-changing forms of storytelling with image and text.

Diaspora Diction collects Monsalve’s photographs, photobooks, and ongoing research into identity—and illusions of identity—in the African and Latinx diaspora. The exhibition features images from Monsalve’s first photobook, Clear as Black, a deeply personal and investigative documentary of the community and stories of individuals with a rare type of albinism found in Puerto Rico. Home to a vast hybridity of people, Puerto Rico is also the capital of the world for albinism. “There are layers upon layers that make up how albinism manifests physically, inside and out,” said Monsalve. “Albinism is not just white on this island, it’s black too. There are people who have the condition of albinism, but do not display the physical characteristics commonly known of a person with albinism. They are black, white and everything in between, and they are all people with albinism.”

Diaspora Diction also includes a second, separate body of work in progress, tentatively titled Novena. Photographed during a subsequent visit to Puerto Rico, Novena follows the family of Ricardito, one of subjects of Clear as Black, in the days immediately following the death of his grandfather, the family patriarch.

During the residency at Mason, Monsalve continued her research into these questions of identity, expanding her scope to the Melungeon communities in Appalachia. “This is investigative research in the greater world of the African diaspora. There are communities world-wide, past and present whose blackness was hidden to assimilate, prosper, and ultimately to survive. There are more that simply have no idea they are connected to something other than what mainstream world refers to as ‘white-passing.’ Folks that happen to be white aren’t taught to question that whiteness when speaking about identity, so the fact that these things fall under the scope of investigation is a wild assumption. They are never questioned, and don’t inquire about the self. The continuing research of Clear As Black, moving forward, is about this buried blackness in the North American region of Appalachia.”

The Mason Libraries Artist-in-Residence program, currently in its pilot year, invites an artist to expand or develop a project through research in the libraries’ collections and dialogue with Mason students, faculty, and library staff. More information on the Mason Libraries Artist-in-Residence program is available on the Fenwick Gallery website, http://fenwickgallery.gmu.edu/residency.

Diaspora Diction will be on display in Fenwick Gallery, located in Fenwick Library on Mason’s Fairfax campus, from May 28 to July 26, 2019. The gallery is open during Library business hours; see the Library’s website at http://library.gmu.edu for the most accurate and up-to-date information.

For more information on this exhibition at Fenwick Gallery, contact Stephanie Grimm, Art and Art History Librarian, at sgrimm4@gmu.edu. For general inquiries about the University Libraries or George Mason University, contact Jessica Clark, Development and Communications Officer, at jclarkw@gmu.edu.

Artist-in-Residence: Artist’s Talk

Fenwick Gallery will present Diaspora Diction, an exhibition of photography from Adriana Monsalve, Mason Libraries’ first Artist-in-Residence. The exhibition will be on display from May 28 through July 26, 2019. Please join us for an opening artist’s talk and reception on Tuesday, May 28 at 2 p.m. in Fenwick 2001. As part of her artist’s talk, Monsalve will discuss the works included in Diaspora Diction as well as the research conducted during her residency at Mason, where she has continued her exploration of questions of identity.

MPA award exhibit in the Music Library

From May 3-24, 2019, the Music Library (Fenwick 2600), is hosting an exhibit of the Music Publishers Association 2018 Paul Revere Award Winners.

Established in 1964 in honor of the 200th anniversary of the first music engraving in America by the famous silversmith Paul Revere, these awards were initially given as a means of alerting the music industry to the advantages of providing the best possible publication from the viewpoint of engraving, graphic arts and production standards. Today the awards still recognize outstanding examples of graphic design, with an emphasis on usability for orchestras, educators, libraries and individuals.

For more information, please contact Steve Gerber, sgerber@gmu.edu.