A few Mason Author titles to consider

This week, we are highlighting some recent publications by Mason authors, representing various academic disciplines and viewpoints. All are available for checkout from the Libraries! Remember, you can find more faculty and alumni publications and profiles over at the Mason Spirit. You can find more titles in the Libraries’ collection by checking out our Faculty Author Collection at bit.ly/masonauthors. And, don’t forget about the next Libraries’ Mason Author Series event on Thursday, November 16 at 3pm in the Fenwick Main Reading Room, where Patricia Donahue will discuss Participation, Community, and Public Policy in a Virginia Suburb.


The Chance of Salvation: A History of Conversion in America
Lincoln A. Mullen, Assistant Professor, History and Art History

The Chance of Salvation (Harvard University Press, August 2017) offers a history of conversions in the United States which shows how religious identity came to be a matter of choice. By uncovering the way religious identity is structured as obligatory decision, this book explores why Americans change religions and why the U.S. is both highly religious in terms of religious affiliation and very secular in the sense that no religion is an unquestioned default.


Trump Effect 
Karina V. Korostelina, Professor, School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution

In Trump Effect (Routledge, October 2016), Korostelina explains how the support for Trump among the American general public is based on three pillars: 1) Trump champions a specific conception of American national identity that empowers his supporters, 2) Trump’s leadership has been crafted from his ability to recognize where and with whom he can get the most return on his investment, and 3) Trump challenges the existing political balance of power within the United States and globally.


Governing Under Stress: The Implementation of Obama’s Economic Stimulus Program
Timothy J. Conlan, Priscilla M. Regan, and Paul L. Posner, Schar School of Policy and Government

Governing Under Stress (Georgetown University Press, January 2017) presents perspectives on the implementation and performance of President Obama’s economic stimulus program, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). It explores the management of ARRA within all levels of government as well as its portrayals in the media and public perception. Contributors draw upon more than 200 interviews and nationwide field research to present insights into the challenges facing public policy and management.


Resolving Structural Conflicts: How Violent Systems Can Be Transformed
Richard E. Rubenstein, University Professor, School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution

Resolving Structural Conflicts (Routledge, January 2017) analyzes how certain social systems generate violent conflict and discusses how such systems can be transformed to create the conditions for positive peace. The book addresses a key issue in the field of conflict studies: what to do about violent conflicts that are not the results of misunderstanding, prejudice, or malice, but the products of a social system that generates violent conflict as part of its normal operations.


The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream
Tyler Cowen, BS Economics ’83, Holbert L. Harris Chair of Economics; Distinguished Senior Fellow, F.A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics; and General Director, Mercatus Center

In The Complacent Class (St. Martin’s Press, February 2017), Cowen examines the trend of Americans away from the traditionally mobile, risk-accepting, and adaptable tendencies that defined them for much of recent history, and toward stagnation and comfort. He argues that this development has the potential to make future changes more disruptive.

Mason Author Series: Patricia Donahue

Join the University Libraries for our next Mason Author Series event on Thursday, November 16, at 3pm in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room (2001). Patricia Donahue will discuss her recent book, Participation, Community, and Public Policy in a Virginia Suburb.

Communities are the sum of myriad types of participation—positive, negative, formal, informal, direct, and indirect. Participation, Community, and Public Policy in a Virginia Suburb challenges conventional wisdom about participation in modern American communities through the story of Northern Virginia’s Pimmit Hills. Participation is much more than the activities, such as voting or attending religious services, tracked by social surveys. Pimmit Hills’s story will be familiar to those who grew up in middle-class suburbs, even as its proximity to Washington, D.C. makes its story unique.

About the Author: Patricia Farrell Donahue received her M.A. in public policy from Georgetown University and Ph.D. in public policy from George Mason University. She is the 2014 Recipient of Mason’s Robert L. Fisher Award for Best Dissertation and Academic Achievement. She has worked as a policy analyst in the federal government, on community and economic development, emergency management, and other topics. She also serves as a Policy Fellow at GMU’s Schar School of Government and Policy.

About the Mason Author Series: The University Libraries’ Mason Author Series features Mason faculty and alumni authors throughout the year, and is generously sponsored by the University Bookstore. For more information about the Mason Author Series, please contact John Warren, Head, Mason Publishing, jwarre13@gmu.edu, or Jessica Clark, Development & Communications Officer, jclarkw@gmu.edu.

Artists’ Book Vendors Visit

Interested in artists’ books and zine collections? Or how the University Libraries considers collection additions? Stop by Fenwick Library next week when the Libraries host two artists’ book vendors. The visits are open to the entire Mason community. Faculty are especially encouraged to attend and provide feedback on potential artists’ book purchases.

Booklyn Artist Alliance
Monday, November 13, 10am – 12pm
Special Collections Research Center (Fenwick Library, Room 2400), Seminar Room

Booklyn’s mission is to promote artists’ books as art and research material and to assist artists and organizations in documenting, exhibiting, and distributing their artworks and archives. Felice Tebbe will visiting us with the latest in artist’s books, print folios, and zines.

Vamp & Tramp Booksellers
Tuesday, November 14, 10:30am – 1pm
Special Collections Research Center (Fenwick Library, Room 2400), Seminar Room

Vamp & Tramp specialize in contemporary fine press and artists’ books representing a diverse body of artists and techniques, and will bring some of the newest arrivals to their collection for us to consider. Learn more at http://www.vampandtramp.com

Libraries welcomes Mason Families!

The Mason Libraries welcomes families this week, with two special events as part of Mason’s Family Weekend (November 10-12, 2017).

On Friday, November 10, from 3pm to 4pm, join us in Gateway Library, Room 228 for “True or False? Uncovering Fake News” – a fun, family-friendly workshop on identifying fake news. This interactive session addresses the many faces of news today from the slightly misleading to the biased to the truly outrageous.

On Saturday, November 11, stop by between 3pm and 5pm in Fenwick Library, Room 1014B for “The Magical Art of Minicomics and Zines: a Quick Intro.” Ever wanted to make your own comic, but didn’t know where to start? What would you write about? How would you share it with other people? Come learn about minicomics and zines, two kinds of homemade or “do-it-yourself” publications. You’ll learn a few simple methods for folding and making 8-page booklets and ways to tell a story in eight short pages. This workshop is kid-friendly, drop-in, and hands on, so you can come and go as you like. Materials will be provided.

Since 2003, Mason has welcomed families to campus for Family Weekend with a variety of events that provide families the opportunity to connect, have fun, and make new memories. For more information and the full schedule, visit https://masonfamilyevents.gmu.edu/.