Mason Author Series: Patricia Donahue

Join the University Libraries for our next Mason Author Series event on Thursday, November 16, at 3pm in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room (2001). Patricia Donahue will discuss her recent book, Participation, Community, and Public Policy in a Virginia Suburb.

Communities are the sum of myriad types of participation—positive, negative, formal, informal, direct, and indirect. Participation, Community, and Public Policy in a Virginia Suburb challenges conventional wisdom about participation in modern American communities through the story of Northern Virginia’s Pimmit Hills. Participation is much more than the activities, such as voting or attending religious services, tracked by social surveys. Pimmit Hills’s story will be familiar to those who grew up in middle-class suburbs, even as its proximity to Washington, D.C. makes its story unique.

About the Author: Patricia Farrell Donahue received her M.A. in public policy from Georgetown University and Ph.D. in public policy from George Mason University. She is the 2014 Recipient of Mason’s Robert L. Fisher Award for Best Dissertation and Academic Achievement. She has worked as a policy analyst in the federal government, on community and economic development, emergency management, and other topics. She also serves as a Policy Fellow at GMU’s Schar School of Government and Policy.

About the Mason Author Series: The University Libraries’ Mason Author Series features Mason faculty and alumni authors throughout the year, and is generously sponsored by the University Bookstore. For more information about the Mason Author Series, please contact John Warren, Head, Mason Publishing, jwarre13@gmu.edu, or Jessica Clark, Development & Communications Officer, jclarkw@gmu.edu.

Libraries welcomes Mason Families!

The Mason Libraries welcomes families this week, with two special events as part of Mason’s Family Weekend (November 10-12, 2017).

On Friday, November 10, from 3pm to 4pm, join us in Gateway Library, Room 228 for “True or False? Uncovering Fake News” – a fun, family-friendly workshop on identifying fake news. This interactive session addresses the many faces of news today from the slightly misleading to the biased to the truly outrageous.

On Saturday, November 11, stop by between 3pm and 5pm in Fenwick Library, Room 1014B for “The Magical Art of Minicomics and Zines: a Quick Intro.” Ever wanted to make your own comic, but didn’t know where to start? What would you write about? How would you share it with other people? Come learn about minicomics and zines, two kinds of homemade or “do-it-yourself” publications. You’ll learn a few simple methods for folding and making 8-page booklets and ways to tell a story in eight short pages. This workshop is kid-friendly, drop-in, and hands on, so you can come and go as you like. Materials will be provided.

Since 2003, Mason has welcomed families to campus for Family Weekend with a variety of events that provide families the opportunity to connect, have fun, and make new memories. For more information and the full schedule, visit https://masonfamilyevents.gmu.edu/.

Celebrate Mason Authors!

Fall for the Book may have concluded for this year, but the celebration of authors and writing continues in November with National Authors Day (November 1) and National Novel Writing Month (begun in 1999).

To celebrate, the Libraries will be highlighting some of our Mason authors throughout the month. We encourage you to join us by exploring some of these authors and titles as well. The Mason Spirit features recent faculty and alumni publications and profiles. To see which of these books are in the Libraries’ collection, check out our Faculty Author Collection by visiting bit.ly/masonauthors. If you post about your readings on social media use #NationalAuthorsDay.

And, don’t forget about the Libraries’ Mason Author Series, hosted throughout the year. Our next event will be held on Thursday, November 16 at 3pm in the Fenwick Main Reading Room (2001). Patricia Donahue will discuss her recent book, Participation, Community, and Public Policy in a Virginia Suburb.

Advances in Science Exhibit

Bioscience. Space Exploration. Engineering. Information Technology. These are but a few of the rapidly advancing fields of science which affect our modern lives. Achievements in these disciplines were built – and continue to build – upon discoveries made by preceding generations of scientists. As Sir Issac Newton famously wrote, “If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.”

The exhibit Advances in Science 1586-1999: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants explores the layered nature of scientific research, in which new knowledge is gained over the framework of each new discovery. In this exhibit, we see how the scientific method, first advocated by Sir Francis Bacon, informed the methodology of naturalist, Charles Darwin and later, the scientists who discovered DNA, Watson and Crick. In the field of applied mathematics, the theories espoused by Euclid during the 3rd Century, B.C. created a system of mathematical thinking that would not be expanded until the 19th century. And even as applied mathematics advances and paradigms shift, the work of Euclid remains relevant.

This exhibition explores the evolution of scientific thought through rare books, archival documents, and photographs. It examines two main branches of science: the life sciences and applied mathematics. Featuring the works of Euclid, Bacon, Spallanzani, Pasteur, Linnaeus, and Darwin, Advances in Science 1586-1999: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants spans the period between the formulation of the scientific method to the construction of the International Space Station. A reception will be held on November 7, 3-5 p.m., Special Collections Research Center, 2400 Fenwick Library. Robinson Professor, Dr. James Trefil, is the guest speaker.

For more information, please contact Rebecca Bramlett, rbramlet@gmu.edu, 703-933-2058.