Library Faculty Receive H.W. Wilson Grant

We are delighted to announce that two of our Libraries’ faculty members – Janna Mattson (Instructional and Social Sciences Librarian) and Michael English (Online Learning Coordinator and Instructional Librarian) – were selected to receive the prestigious H.W. Wilson Library Staff Development Grant, administered by the American Library Association (ALA).

Janna and Michael’s proposal, “13 Things in Blackboard: A Self-paced Online Learning Professional Development Program,” aims to foster Mason Libraries’ faculty/staff knowledge and collaboration in supporting online education.

Please see the press release from the ALA – the award will be presented on Sunday, June 25 at the ALA Annual Conference in Chicago – and also join us in congratulating Janna and Michael on their successful initiative, which directly aligns their program with George Mason University’s strategic plan.

Spring into Well-Being with the Libraries!

Spring into Well-Being is here! Shake off the stress of spring semester and cultivate your physical, emotional, and community well-being with the following resources from the University Libraries.

NYTimes Food and Travel

Dig deeper than the front page and discover a world of food and travel. Strengthen your body with a wholesome loaf of Nordic whole-grain rye as you contemplate a hiking trip through remote Canada. Restore your spirit with a batch of chocolate ice cream profiteroles while planning a dream getaway to Barcelona. Explore new communities, learn new traditions, and recharge your batteries—all for free, from the comfort of home. NOTE: First time users must create a new account here using their GMU credentials to gain access.

National Geographic Virtual Library

Broaden your perspective and investigate the world with National Geographic online. Browse full-color issues from 1888 to the present; explore maps, images, and videos; or play with the interactive Term Frequency chart and watch the way we talk about our world shift through the years.

Swank Digital Campus

For those days when you just need to watch a movie, explore this rotating collection of 25 feature films and documentaries. Challenge yourself with films like An Inconvenient Truth or Malcolm X; watch a recent blockbuster like Inglourious Basterds; or kick back with a classic like The Breakfast Club or The Godfather. Specific titles may change over time. NOTE: Requires local installation of Widevine Media Optimizer; best accessed via Google Chrome.

These are just a few of the many resources available via the Libraries for Mason faculty, staff, and students. Just login with your Mason NetID and password. For more information on the resources available to you through the University Libraries, browse the Libraries’ subject lists of online resources or contact one of the subject specialists.

Mason Author Series: General Michael V. Hayden

Join the University Libraries for a discussion with General Michael V. Hayden about his book, Playing to the Edge: American Intelligence in the Age of Terror, on Thursday, May 4 at 3 p.m. in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room.

For General Michael Hayden, playing to the edge means playing so close to the line that you get chalk dust on your cleats. Otherwise, by playing back, you may protect yourself, but you will be less successful in protecting America. “Play to the edge” was Hayden’s guiding principle when he ran the National Security Agency, and it remained so when he ran the CIA.  In his view, many shortsighted and uninformed people are quick to criticize, and this book will give them much to chew on but little easy comfort; it is an unapologetic insider’s look told from the perspective of the people who faced awesome responsibilities head on, in the moment.

How did American intelligence respond to terrorism, a major war and the most sweeping technological revolution in the last 500 years?  What was the NSA before 9/11 and how did it change in its aftermath?  Why did the NSA begin the controversial terrorist surveillance program that included the acquisition of domestic phone records? What else was set in motion during this period that formed the backdrop for the infamous Snowden revelations in 2013?

For 10 years, General Michael Hayden was a participant in some of the most telling events in the annals of American national security. General Hayden’s goals in writing this book are simple and unwavering: No apologies. No excuses. Just what happened. And why. As he writes, “There is a story here that deserves to be told, without varnish and without spin. My view is my view, and others will certainly have different perspectives, but this view deserves to be told to create as complete a history as possible of these turbulent times. I bear no grudges, or at least not many, but I do want this to be a straightforward and readable history for that slice of the American population who depend on and appreciate intelligence, but who do not have the time to master its many obscure characteristics.”

General and Distinguished Visiting Professor Michael Hayden is a retired four-star general who served as director of the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency — the only person to helm both agencies— during a time of heinous new threats and wrenching change. In addition to leading CIA and NSA, General Hayden was the country’s first principal deputy director of national intelligence and the highest-ranking military intelligence officer in the country.  He also served as commander of the Air Intelligence Agency and Director of the Joint Command and Control Warfare Center and served in senior staff positions at the Pentagon, at US European Command, at the National Security Council, and the US Embassy in Bulgaria. He was also the deputy chief of staff for the United Nations Command and US Forces in South Korea. He is currently a principal at the Chertoff Group and a distinguished visiting professor at the George Mason University Schar School of Policy and Government.

Presentation: Missing Out on Innovation

Missing Out on Innovation: African-American Teens & Technology

DR. KEVIN CLARK, DIRECTOR
CENTER FOR DIGITAL MEDIA INNOVATION & DIVERSITY
APRIL 27    1:30 – 2:30 P.M.    MAIN READING ROOM    2001 FENWICK

Based on a new national survey, young African-Americans may be missing out on key opportunities to learn to code, develop apps and software, and innovate with technology. Sponsored by Mason Libraries, Dr. Kevin Clark will speak about his recent research on African-American teens and digital innovations on Thursday, April 27, 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., Main Reading Room, 2001 Fenwick. The hour-long presentation includes a question and answer session.

Dr. Clark is a professor in Mason’s College of Education and Human Development, and is also the Director of Mason’s Center for Digital Media Innovation and Diversity.

For more information, please contact Andrew Lee, yli7 at gmu.edu