Mason Libraries Announces Artist-in-Residence Program Pilot

George Mason University Libraries is excited to announce a new venture: the Mason Libraries Artist-in-Residence Program. For our first (pilot) year, we’ve invited Adriana Monsalve, a photobook artist and publisher, to join us in a research and visual arts project.

Throughout April and May 2019, Monsalve will be dividing her residency between the Mason Libraries (particularly the Fenwick Gallery and the Special Collections Research Center in Fenwick Library) and the Mason School of Art to lead a series of in-class lectures and workshops, and to conduct research in the library’s photobook and artists’ book collections. The residency will conclude with an exhibition curated by Monsalve, a special artist’s talk, and the publication of a collaborative zine produced by Mason students and faculty.

“I am a storyteller and visual communicator that produces in-depth stories on identity through the nuances in between. As a daughter of immigrants from the Caribbean Republic of Colombia, I have struggled with the concept of ‘home.’ As immigrants, we are everywhere and we have to belong somewhere, so we’ve made habitats for ourselves in pocket towns of people like us. I’m documenting to show you something I’ve found and ultimately, something I am. I’m documenting so you know I was here. I am an artist, book maker, and educator… but I am still reclaiming space. I am growing into the many things that were made for me at the intersection of personal, political, and poetic.”

About Adriana Monsalve: Adriana Monsalve is an artist and collaborative publisher working in the photo book medium. Together with Caterina Ragg, they run Homie House Press from Beltsville, MD and Lambrate, Milano, Italy. HHP is a radical cooperative platform where they challenge the ever-changing forms of storytelling with image + text.

Monsalve earned a Masters in Photojournalism from the University of Westminster, London in 2013. In 2018, she was awarded the Lucie Independent Photo Book Prize for her collaborative photo book, Femme Frontera, a project which was funded by the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures and was part of the Master Artist Grant for 2017.

The works of Homie House Press have been collected in the Library of Congress, the Thomas J. Watson Library at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and Maryland Institute College of Art, among other private collections. At Mason, you can find Monsalve’s photobooks and HHP publications in the Mason Libraries Artists’ Book Collection, housed in the Special Collections Research Center.

See more on Monsalve’s work and HHP at http://www.adrianastories.com.


This residency is sponsored by the George Mason University Libraries, the Mason School of Art, and the Mason University Life Programming Fund. For more details about the program and upcoming events, visit the Fenwick Gallery website, http://fenwickgallery.gmu.edu/residency.

New release from GMU Press

The George Mason University Press has released The Unlikely Reformer: Carter Glass and Financial Regulation by Matthew P. Fink.

Recently described as “the single most important lawmaker in the history of American finance,” Carter Glass nonetheless remains a much misunderstood and overlooked figure in that history. Glass is most widely remembered as the sponsor (with Henry Steagall) of the Glass-Steagall provisions of the U.S.A. Banking Act of 1933, which legally separated commercial and investment banking. But the Banking Act was the culminating achievement of a monumental career as a congressman, secretary of the Treasury, and senator—a career marked by ferocity and paradox.

Glass was a small-government conservative and vocal racist who was, however, also responsible for some of the most important progressive pieces of financial legislation in U.S. history, including the Federal Reserve Act of 1913, which created mechanisms for addressing financial panics and managing the nation’s currency, and provisions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which created the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, the model New Deal agency. In The Unlikely Reformer, Matthew Fink explains how these apparent contradictions emerged together at a pivotal moment in the modern American era. As the first new study dedicated to Carter Glass published in over seventy-five years, it updates our perspective on the welter of assumptions, beliefs, and motivations underpinning a regulatory project that continues to be topical in the tumultuous contemporary moment.

About the Author: Matthew P. Fink is the author of The Rise of Mutual Funds: An Insider’s View. He is Director of the Retirement Income Industry Association and former President of the Investment Company Institute.

About GMU Press: The George Mason University Press supports the academic mission of George Mason University by publishing peer-reviewed, scholarly works of distinction, written by authors from a wide range of intellectual perspectives, for a diverse, worldwide readership. GMU Press publishes in a variety of disciplines with special focus on the history, politics, and culture of Northern Virginia and the wider District of Columbia metropolitan area, as well as other topics such as public policy, international affairs, and higher education.

And the winner is…

Thank you to everyone who participated in our very own take on March Madness, as curated by our Special Collections Research Center (SCRC) team! SCRC selected their staff favorites, and each week the voting commenced, bracket-style. The competition was fierce, but the people have chosen, and the winner is:

Professor Arthur M. Whitehall, Jr. of the University of North Carolina, January 1950, Oliver F. Atkins photograph collection, C0036, Box 15, Folder 11, Special Collections Research Center, George Mason University Libraries

SCRC’s Staff Picks will remain on display through August 2019, so please come by and check them out in person. They are also available for viewing in SCRC’s Flickr album.